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Are light twin aircraft safe?

Discussion in 'Airplane, Aircraft & Jumbo Jet Talk' started by Richard Wyeroski, Oct 25, 2020.

  1. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    Recently the FAA has come out with an Airworthy Directive AD against light Cessna twin aircraft flying in icing conditions. The FAA after approving these aircraft, since their original development, has now come out saying they are dangerous!

    Twin aircraft should not be flown in icing conditions even thought they were certified to do so!

    Unfortunately, flight twin aircraft have a high accident rate and insurance companies are reluctant to insure them.

    This is an interesting read as the FAA has now back peddled and has removed flight in icing conditions for thes light twin aircraft!!!Even thought they were approved?

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>MORE>>>>>>MORE>>>>>
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  2. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    Anyone that has flown Multi engine aircraft know that the aircraft is vulnerable in the event an engine fails!

    When an engine fails the aircraft loses 80% of it’s performance. Icing conditions are another area where if an engine fails the aircraft will not hold altitude!

    The accident rates on these aircraft are high. Insurance companies are reluctant to give insurance and if they do the costs is excessive. Now that the FAA had come out with their ruling insurance is very limited for owners!
     
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  3. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    I need to ad to this story that twin engine aircraft are safe enough with a properly trained pilot/owner and in weather conditions that are safe to fly in. Having owned twin engine aircraft and taught pilots for the multi-engine rating there are dangers that are covered in training. Experience adds to safety.

    I have flown jet aircraft with two engines as a crew. Turbine engines are literally more reliable then piston engines. In the event of an engine failure jet aircraft have much more performance in this condition then a twin engine piston aircraft.

    It is nice knowing when the weather gets really bad that the systems in a jet aircraft can handle the situation resonantly well.

    Lose an engine in a jet (still mostly rare) the aircraft can maintain altitude and fly in icing conditions. In the same situation with a piston twin, lose an engine and the aircraft will have to descend and will not maintain any altitude in icing conditions. In other words every aboard will die unless the pilot has luck and can land the aircraft at an airport.

    In my opinion this is not acceptable and the insurance companies know this and have made it very difficult to insure twin engine aircraft to the point that they will not cover the aircraft in icing conditions.

    Today the FAA is pushing their “risk Management” agenda. Simply they require training for pilots by instructors that one can be killed in an aircraft taking off or landing.

    Thanks
     
  4. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    I should add another point about twin jets. In the event of an engine failure all jets have drift down altitude. So if one is comfortably flying at FL380, 38 thousand feet, based on its weight the aircraft will drift down in to the twenty thousand foot plus altitude...
     
  5. Exuma Guy

    Exuma Guy Hangar Silver Member VI

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    The general public thinks that Twin Cessna's and Twin piper's are as safe as big airliners.
    Fact is that certification regs for these are less stringent. They only need to maintain 6000' on 1 engine-
    not required to climb, and that's on fresh engines and props. The older airplanes that were grand-fathered into current regs don't even meet that low standard. It's a quiet solemn reality that airplanes like the Beech 18 just carry you to the scene of the accident on 1 engine.
    When I hauled pax in C-402's, I bit my tongue when some a-hole accused me of flying over-weight. I wanted to bust out and tell them that being at legal gross weight as we were was still a gamble, but prudence for maintaining business meant keeping my mouth shut.
     
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  6. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    I remember when we were in training at the FAA Academy in OKC. We flew new Beech Baron twins and had to keep 400 pounds below gross to get reasonable performance on one engine.

    To make things interesting, the puny 260’ climb rate at gross losing one on take off is based on standard temperature of 59 degrees. This was attainable with gear up and prop feathered!

    NUTS!
     
  7. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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