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The regulator said what???

Discussion in 'FAA News, Opinion and Articles' started by Rotorruss, Jun 13, 2019 at 12:36 PM.

  1. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member IV

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  2. Exuma Guy

    Exuma Guy Hangar Silver Member VI

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    "1 fatality in 10 years"?
    Did I miss something too?
     
  3. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member IV

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    The regulator is mad that they had to count the one fatal too. They tried everything to get the death to not count as an accident. They even tried to say it wasn't an uncontained engine failure because the containment ring wasn't breached. Oh the play on words and wordsmithing.
     
  4. Kevin

    Kevin Hangar Bronze Member III

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    No, no no, that wasn't a real death. That was some woman who opened up the cabin window to get some air, that wasn't an accident. Also the Atlas Air crash, well those were just a bunch of boxes that got dumped in the water. What are pilots? Oh yes and those 346 people killed by the incompetence of Boeing in the FAA, after all didn't happen in the U.S. so they don't count. The FAA has to get their house in order before taking on flying UBERs what a friggin disaster that will be. Oh but just like GA that will only be a couple of people killed at time not a big crash so that won't count either. Idiots.
     
  5. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    ......accidents are reduced to incidents (which means it is not counted and reported to Congress)

    Runway incursions are not “all reported” which means the incursion number is kept at an exceptable number.

    Are controller errors reported? Maybe not!

    The accident rate does not change year after year. Actually operations are down, which means the accident rate is increasing...

    International field inspections are way down, which means foreign operators and maintenance facilities are receiving little or no government inspections......

    The layers of safety have been removed so it means that the next result will be an increase in accidents......
     
  6. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member IV

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    And the acting Administrator said to congress:

    Acting FAA Administrator Daniel Elwell said the strategy has "consistently produced safe aircraft designs for decades." And he said the agency would need 10,000 more employees and an additional $1.8 billion a year to do all the work now done by designated employees of the companies it regulates.

    Sounds like a mismanagement problem with the new oversight structure if they can't handle the workload. Maybe it's true that the regulator has too many chiefs and not enough Indians?? After all, the data driven administration will be able to detect failures and save lives. :rolleyes:
     
  7. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    I wonder why he did not mention the flawed ATOS system used to inspect the 10 biggest airlines in the nation?

    Basically a special ATOS inspector sits at his computer and provides over site of an operator without having to physically go the the operator and look at a plane......Strange in my opinion

    The failure of ATOS was a factor in the Alaskan Airlines crash. It was a small crash where an MD-80 crashed in the Pacific oF the coast of California. Only 88 passengers were killed horribly. The crew flew it down and hopefully did not suffer too much

    It was a system approved by an FAA manager and is a failure to detect anything!

    MY opinion.......WTF!!!

    ATOS was not very effective in catching this crash.



    https://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/11/...tied-long-failure-lubricate-tail-control.html
     
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  8. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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  9. Kevin

    Kevin Hangar Bronze Member III

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    Those people in the Alaska Airlines flight died horribly. they all knew they were going to die and not a quick death either they suffered flying inverted and yes probably thanks to the pilots they missed diving the MD-80 into some populated area on the California coast.

    But that was OK. Quadruple the maintenance time on the jackscrew for the horizontal stabilizer and then quadruple it again before anybody bothered to look at it. Epic fail. That would be like me running my car for 28,000 miles without checking and changing the oil and wondering why the engine seized up.

    I don't want to hear how safe the aviation system has been for the past decade without a fatality. It's stretching the truth. Just like the stock market it's time for a correction. It's going to happen my father would call it the cyclical harmonics of systems one of his engineering terms I now understand. When the correction comes it will be big, shocking and the media will be all over it. Yes this one happened on U.S. soil. I pray it doesn't happen I just feel its long overdue. I hope I'm wrong.
     
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  10. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    Your right Kevin. It’s coming because the layers of safety are gone. It’s just luck now......only luck and when system failure strikes because of poor maintnenance from over seas unregulated shops our pilots handle it!

    Ed and I would talk about it all the time. Ed knew things were getting bad. The pressure he was under by his former FSDO literally helped hasten his disease and in the end it was a factor that killed him. I know the slimes that were behind his troubles were happy he died.....imagine they were happy.....

    The sad fact is when an accident occurs there will be more then one before there is any reaction from anyone.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2019 at 6:21 AM
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