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NTSB reveals what shattered the SouthWest 737 window: FlightAware

Discussion in 'FAA News, Opinion and Articles' started by Lord Leighton, May 13, 2018.

  1. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    Last edited: May 13, 2018
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  2. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ...so, what will it take to ensure that this doesn't happen again?? Ultrasound only can find so much.
     
  3. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    MRIs? eg: With my neck/lower back, X-rays showed nothing, CAT Scans showed nothing, MRIs showed EVERYTHING. I don't know if the engines could stand all that noise. :rolleyes:
     
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  4. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ...so the paperwork said they did the inspection. Out of thousands of blades inspected they only found one that was bad?? It was two years between incidents. How many more will be found bad before the next failure happens??

    Maybe the "regulator" shouldn't allow "self regulating"!!
     
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  5. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    That I believe we will never know....too many of these blades floating around with fake paper work. Most are from third world MRO maintenance facilities....there will be more incidents as these unairworthy blades are rebuilt during overhaul!!!

    Does the regulator know anything about this????.......I doubt it!!
     
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  6. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ... chances are they don't know nor do they want to know since they closed down the IFO stations. They are trying to "regulate" from the US offices and from sitting behind a computer. The only way to combat SUPs, is to have eyes on the source.
     
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  7. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    The Lack of Proper Oversight, is one NTSB term in summing up the investigation of an accident. The FAA has been found numerous times to be included in the cause of the accident because of "lack of Proper Oversight"

    The cause of the Southwest Airline fan blade failure that caused the death of a passenger is still under investigation. FAA may be responsible because of not doing the proper surveillance on airline maintenance.

    Fan blades are overhauled all over the world. Airlines send their aircraft to MRO maintenance facilities in the US and overseas. Unfortunately FAA does all most no surveillance on these MRO's.

    So the CFM-56-7B engine has an emergency Airworthiness Directive AD against it, to inspect for these defective blades. Does the FAA know that these inspections are being carried out properly?

    I would say that if FAA does no surveillance overseas, how would they know if these inspections are being performed.. The answer is there is no way of knowing until a blade fails again!
     
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  8. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ...I hear that there were over a thousand blades a day inspected. They only found one blade that eas bad out of all the blades. Now, I'd like to see how you can inspect 50+blades an hour, every hour and have some sort of quality control?

    How many blades "passed" and will fail before the next inspection? Time will tell. Just hope it doesn't bring down the aircraft and killed everyone on board the next time a blade failure happens.
     
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  9. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    Considering that all the fan blades (24) have to be removed to be inspected is interesting? That's 48 blades per engine.... Yes! how good are these inspections and just who is doing them......maybe the overseas shops are playing games.....?
     
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  10. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ..I can just imagine how the "executive director for safety" would look on TV to say that an operator was "extremely careless" but no prosecutor would take action against them. It worked for the FBI and secret document handling.

    Come on "biggly one", "drain the swamp"!!
     
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  11. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    .....I heard an alternate method of compliance AMOC is to spray die penetrant on the blades instead of removing them and using eddy current non destructive testing procedures NDT. It's cheaper and faster, but may not be as effective.....
     
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  12. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    o_O
     
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  13. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    Even dye penetrant takes longer.....much longer?
     
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  14. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ...all testing has limitations. Ultrasound, Eddy and dye penetrant are susptable to human error. At 50 blades an hour, what are the chances that something is overlooked?? Why allow an AMOC to a lower and simplier test?? Are the failed parts propagating from the surface or are there internal flaws in the metal?? Is the 2016 failure the same as this one??

    I remember the Sioux City crash was an internal flaw. I think the AMOC is a mistake, but I have brain damage caused by the "regulator's" carelessness!!
     
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  15. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ...heard the NTSB said that it was internal crack propogation. I don't think dye penetrant would be a good choice to find internal flaws. The "regulator" should know better than to let an unreliable test to be considered for an AMOC!! Might as well "pencil whip" the test results!!
     
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  16. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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  17. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    There is a lot of misguided information out there on exactly what needs to be done with CFM-56 fan blade inspections. The fan blade failed twice. The second time a passenger was killed.

    The CFM-56 engine is on thousands of 737's. The cost to airlines is more then a few hours to check blades. First off the blades have to be removed to be checked in the first place. Each aircraft has 48 blades. Just setting up to properly perform the recommended ultrasonic procedure has to be coordinated. Aircraft have to be taken out of service and flown to the maintenance base. Setting up the inspection procedure and equipment requires time and skill. If one looks at the video below on just removing the blades, it becomes obvious that this is no quickie procedure.

    Other airlines besides Southwest also have to inspect their Fan blades and many are asking for an extension.

    So I will say if another blade fails, I can see a lot of 737's getting hit by an Emergency AD grounding order......

    Let's hope not but there are problems with fake paperwork and bogus parts and I believe this just may have caught up with the industry!

    CFM-56 Fan blade removal.
     
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  18. Everett 757

    Everett 757 Hangar Silver Member VI

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    Very interesting! It is quite detailed, and not a quick operation. Thanks Rich for posting this.
     
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  19. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ...great post, Rich. I don't know how any operator could get an AMOC for the ultrasonic requirement. The question is, why didn't the "regulator" require this inspection after the 2016 incident. I find the lack of tracibility of the blades quite disturbing. I hear that the flight deck crew said the plane flew like s brick. Was it because of the damage to the wing, asymmetrical thrust, or cabin decompression with a human body half out the aircraft? Having to land at speed +30 knots for controllably shows the seriousness of the damage. I'm sure the NTSB is going to pick the "regulator" in the nuts for not responding sooner because of the 2016 incident. They need to be kicked and the people responsible disciplined. Had the "regulator" done their job, the fatality may have been prevented.
     
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  20. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    The aircraft was damaged when the blade let go. The other 23 blades were out of balance which explains for the severe vibration. Shutting done the engine does not stop the core from turning. The drag caused by the damaged cowling and wing could have easily made it impossible to maintain altitude on one engine. The crew did their jobs and luck once again prevailed and the aircraft landed safely. Had not a passenger been killed this accident would have received little media attention.
     
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