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Flight Ops Challenge - and the case for E-Taxi documented: AirInsight

Discussion in 'Airport News, Talk & Discussion' started by Lord Leighton, Mar 31, 2016.

  1. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    Flight Ops Challenge – And the case for E-Taxi documented
    Published March 31, 2016
    [​IMG]
    E-taxi pioneers Wheeltug just released resarch (Pushback Time Savings summary 30 Mar 2016) it undertook monitoring airport operations. The case for adding e-taxi capabilities to aircraft has tended to focus on saving fuel burn. But fuel burn is no longer such an important issue in cost terms, though in “green” terms cutting fuel burn is still attractive. Wheeltug has, for some time now, been focusing on time savings rather than fuel savings. A generally accepted cost for airline operations is $100 per minute. More on this shortly.

    Wheeltug estimates that by deploying e-taxi, an airline could save approximately a total of seven minutes per aircraft per gate push-back. Wheeltug’s research indicates push-back times vary a lot and the next chart shows just by how much. Wheeltug claims that the average push-back time is 5:35, but note the huge standard deviation. (The data source is Flightwatching and based on a complete set of 6700 monitored flights) This means that airline ground operations not only take 5:35, but airlines must assume that push-backs could take significantly longer. Schedules get seriously impacted waiting for one aircraft in, say, 10 that takes 12 minutes to push-back. The wide distribution of push-back times forces extra padding into airline block times.

    [​IMG]
    To comprehend the meaning of this let’s look at real world examples. In the next table we have a few selected airlines that demonstrate the impact of faster flight operations with respect to airport gate turnaround times. The yellow cells represent estimates because we did not get responses from these airlines in time for this story. Wheeltug estimates that their 5:35 rises to about seven minutes because they include estimated ground crew and tower savings. Let’s assume that is reasonable.

    In the table we layout the financial impact of these time savings and the $100 per operational minute against single aisle fleets. One can see how that $100 number adds to serious money when considering speeding up airline operations.

    [​IMG]

    Essentially the savings could provide an airline with a lot of extra time every day and that time is worth a staggering amount of money. For American Airlines and Southwest Airlines, the number is around a billion dollars per year. Even British Airways, with the smallest potential savings of $166m, should find this item riveting. Every airline, especially network airlines, are desperate to find operational savings. Here we see an example staring them in the face.

    One can argue the number of minutes and the dollars per minute. Change them, and even then, the potential dollars saved is a large number. Readers working at an airline, try these numbers on your airline’s single aisle fleet. Certainly large enough to warrant a lot of attention, right?

    Anyone who flies knows airlines routinely pad schedules because of the numerous exogenous factors that push schedules to the right. Running an airline on schedule is surely one of the world’s greatest acts of faith outside of organized religion.

    So what does this mean for these sample airlines on a daily basis? The next table attempts an answer.

    [​IMG]

    Airlines that deploy e-taxi could see big time savings that could mean getting another flight out each aircraft every other day or simply serious financial benefits – taking 30 minutes as a guide, this is worth $3,000 per day per plane. Improved operational efficiencies are significant.

    And that ignores the other benefits from things like quieter airports and less air pollution. It appears a lot of tangible benefits could come from deploying a technology like e-taxi.

    © 2016, Addison Schonland. All rights reserved.
     
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  2. Exuma Guy

    Exuma Guy Hangar Silver Member VI

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    The Airinsight.com page is no longer valid. Anyone can tell me how this electric tug will save time over a conventional push-back? On average, the push-back tug is gone before we have the main engines started, so I don't see how they came up with a time savings.
     
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  3. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    Kinda sounds like a Ginzu Knife commercial?
     
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  4. gearup328

    gearup328 Hangar Bronze Member I

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    Is this just for pushback or for all the way to the runway. We already taxi on one engine. There was an article somewhere that was touting an electric nose wheel that would allow you to taxi without an engine running. Never heard any more about it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2016
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  5. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    Southwest uses that one engine real fast too, lol. That has to save time!
     
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  6. Biggles

    Biggles Hangar Bronze Member III

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    A great picture just flashed through my mind of a Southwest 737 pushing his e-tug all the way to the holding point!!

    EG and gearup, aren't there restrictions on tugs moving aircraft forwards after engine start? I remember listening to a KLM 747 being pushed back from the gate at KSFO. There was some obstruction and the tug offered to pull him forwards, but the Captain declined since he said that he had started more than one engine.
     
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  7. Exuma Guy

    Exuma Guy Hangar Silver Member VI

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    Different rules for different airlines. The only restriction my employer has is that the parking brake must be set before doing a cross-bleed start. Cross-bleed starts are done when the APU is inoperative after the first engine is started with ground equipment. The running engine is powered up to provide enough pressure from the bleed air for the opposite engine's starter motor (approximately 40% N1 for us). The area behind us must be clear to prevent damage to persons or property.
     
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  8. Exuma Guy

    Exuma Guy Hangar Silver Member VI

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    It's the same one you heard about. It's still in development with the goal of tugging all the way to the runway.
     
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  9. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    Like they do in Europe a lot.
     
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  10. Biggles

    Biggles Hangar Bronze Member III

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    I appreciate the reply EG. Thank you.
     
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