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First 737 and the MAX 737

Discussion in 'Airplane, Aircraft & Jumbo Jet Talk' started by Richard Wyeroski, Sep 29, 2019.

  1. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    The first 737 was put into service back in 1967. It was a hit, a good single isle airliner. It operated for years

    116FE290-D6D7-49EE-8681-C9A55EB5798F.jpeg

    The 737 MAX is modern. Bigger in length and more powerful engines burning less fuel. The original design was change considerably and the new aircraft handle differently from the first!


    BBD40CF7-F06A-478B-B9E4-74FCA53F9A86.jpeg

    So should have the FAA have required a different Type Rating. This would have required more expense for the airlines.
     
  2. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    The cockpits have changed a little too!

    737
    9F52DEE6-9E82-406F-A2E6-70B8A97907CC.jpeg

    737 MAX
    BE4E2DCC-1898-4BF9-B3B5-1FE7BC882960.jpeg
     
  3. Kevin

    Kevin Hangar Bronze Member IV

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    As I said once before the Boeing 737-200 I flew on Piedmont in the 70's and even the United 737-300 I flew on in the 80's are common and similar "family" appearance only. The NG and then the MAX comes along. I don't know about how different the NG was from that Piedmont 737 is but the MAX should have received it's own new type certification. If Boeing didn't try to sell airplanes like Chrysler sells cars they wouldn't have the MAX issue right now.
     
  4. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    ........exactly!
     
  5. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member IV

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    Last edited: Sep 30, 2019
  6. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    Why an airline would only have one sensor instead two to confirm a malfunction is an accident waiting to happen. Add in poor crew training and the results are two crashes killing 346 people.

    So Boeing should have not made the second sensor optional and an airline should have not ordered aircraft with one sensor!

    WHAT?
     
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  7. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member IV

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    Easy to understand now why the rest of the world doesn't trust the regulator or the manufacturer because of their lack of understanding and the transparency. If it was up to EASA, there would be 3 sensors.
     
  8. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    I is amazing that it came down to one sensor and no one knew about this?
     
  9. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member IV

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    And those who approved it are "safely" retired?! Criminals!!!
     
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  10. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    If they Really wanted to sell airplanes, 100s of 797s would be flying right now with no probs. Their management clearly has/had no sense of vision forward because they are managed by Wall St.
     
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  11. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    Same with the BUAP(Honeywell/Thales)unknowingly installed on most Boeings and some Airbuses. Hillary shares the patent on that, believe it or not(proof provided by Field Mconnell). Convenient huh?
     
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  12. Everett 757

    Everett 757 Hangar Silver Member VII

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    I remember flying on those original 737s in the early 70s. :)
     
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